Snubbed councilwoman votes against business tax; support dropping

City Councilwoman Alison Cormack

BY BRADEN CARTWRIGHT
Daily Post Staff Writer

After negotiations with business leaders went nowhere, the Palo Alto City Council has put off a decision until August on whether to put a business tax on the November ballot.

The majority on council lost Councilwoman Alison Cormack in supporting the business tax on Monday. She said she was “close to cold feet” after talking to voters about the tax over the last week, and she pointed out that Mayor Pat Burt didn’t tell her who was on the committee negotiating with business leaders on a potential compromise.

Council members will make a final decision on the business tax …

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3 Comments

  1. COVID came and many Palo Alto shops closed. Some stayed on (while treading water). So we would assume that our elected leaders would hold off till many years from now to tax businesses. Well no!

    Note: Rentals in the mid-Peninsula are already far higher than further south.

    SOLUTION: We should take 100.000 out of the salary of the City Manager (now at a mind-boggling HALF A MILLION). 45.000 reduction from the Police Chief’s pay. 15.000 from all other City of Palo Alto staff. That is the way to go first. No tax!!

    ANOTHER TAKE ON THE TAXING OF PALO ALTO BUSINESSES: WHY NOT ASK COMPANIES TO SUPPORT OUR CITY’S SOCIAL AND CULTURAL PROJECTS WITH A TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATION vs A TAXED OBLIGATION?

  2. Palo Alto has a high commercial vacancy rate now. With the recession, businesses will be choosy about where they operate, and those vast empty buildings will remain vacant. That means fewer people visiting the town’s restaurants and shops. I don’t think council members or the city staff understand how business works. But if they get this tax, they’ll get a lesson in economics.

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