March presidential primary ballot will have several tax questions — here’s a preview

BY SONYA HERRERA
Daily Post Staff Writer

In 67 days, California voters will pick candidates in the Democratic and Republican presidential primaries. But residents of Santa Clara and San Mateo counties will also have to decide on a number of ballot questions, and all but one of them concern tax increases.

In Santa Clara County, the questions are designated by the letters D, G, H and T.

Measure D would change the Mountain View rent control law voters passed in 2016. The measure would, among other things, eliminate the current limit on rent increases, which is the consumer price index, and replace it with a 4% ceiling.

Measure G is a bond measure for Foothill-De Anza Community College District. The district would borrow $898 million, which would be repaid with a property tax of $160 per $1 million of assessed property value. The amount district property owners would have to repay is estimated at $1.56 billion, which includes principal and interest. The taxes to repay the bonds would continue through 2053-54, according to the district’s website. The district says the sale of the bonds would pay for upgrading and repairing classrooms and labs, improving access to buildings for students with disabilities, and repairing plumbing and electrical systems.

Measure H is a parcel tax for the Foothill-De Anza Community College District. The tax, which would be in place for five years, would charge $48 per year per parcel. Proceeds from the tax would pay for salaries, and creating new programs to help students who are homeless or don’t have enough to eat.

Measure T is a bond measure for Mountain View Whisman School District. The district would borrow $259 million, which would be repaid through a $300 tax per $1 million of assessed property value. The estimated total repayment amount is about $538 million, and the estimated revenue from the tax is $18.6 million each year. The district says the sale of the bonds would pay for repairing, upgrading and building new facilities and classrooms.

San Mateo County

In San Mateo County, the ballot questions are Measures L, M, N, O and P.

Measure L is a bond measure for San Mateo Union High School District. The district would borrow $385 million, which would be repaid with a $155.50 tax per $1 million of assessed property value. The estimated total repayment amount is $815 million. The district says the bonds would pay repairs and upgrades to classrooms. It would also pay for construction of housing for school employees.

Measure M is a parcel tax for the La Honda-Pescadero Unified School District. The measure would renew an existing parcel tax for another seven years. The tax would charge property owners $130 per parcel. The district says the tax will pay for teachers’ professional development and add technology in classrooms.

Measure N is a parcel tax for the San Carlos School District. The measure would add $88 to the existing parcel tax rate of $246.60 per parcel, for a total amount of $334.60. This tax would continue for eight years, from July 1 to June 30, 2028. The district says the tax would pay for teacher salaries and to maintain existing classes.

Measure O is a bond measure for Burlingame Elementary School District. The district would borrow $97 million, which would be repaid with a $234.10 tax per $1 million of assessed property value. The estimated total repayment amount is $192 million. The district says sales of the bonds would pay for buildings and upgrading classrooms, improving access to buildings for disabled students, and building homes for district employees.

Measure P is a parcel tax for the Portola Valley School District. The measure would renew an existing parcel tax for another eight years. The tax would charge property owners $581 per parcel beginning on July 1, 2021 and ending on June 30, 2029. The district says the tax would pay for maintaining existing classes, paying teachers, buying new technology, and maintaining library services and PE teachers.

1 Comment

  1. The tax measures are deliberately written to give local administrators and their (s)elected boards wide discretion in spending or squandering the money to be borrowed by selling bonds (or extracted through a per parcel tax).

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